Timberline Trail, Mt. Hood, Oregon

… This 40-mile loop is a fantastic way to experience the immense size and beauty of Mt. Hood.

On the Timberline you’ll encounter lush old-growth forests, pristine alpine waterfalls, wildflower-filled meadows, towering craggy glaciers, rough volcanic landscapes, and some of the finest cascade views around.

The hiking certainly won’t be easy …

HIGHLIGHTS

  • Majestic Mt. Hood Views
  • Cascade Range Vistas
  • Massive Waterfalls
  • Wildflower Meadows
  • Immense Glaciers
  • Easily Accessible
  • Mostly Well Marked & Maintained

Clever Hiker

We’ve added Timberline to our list of best hikes in North America.

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hiking Tronador to Otto Meiling – day 2

trip report by site editor Rick McCharles 

day 1 | 2 | video | info page

Happily, the rain quit sometime during the night. It dawned clear though clouds swirled around the high peak.

Beautiful.

I went wandering up towards the glacier as high as I could.

There was no rush getting back down for the 5pm bus. It was a leisurely day in every respect.

On the descent I took a long break overlooking the gorgeous waterfalls.

I also took the side trip to see the bottom of the falls on the Glaciar Castano Overo trail. Beautiful.

Climbing down 1200m was much easier than ascending.

Originally I’d considered doing a second night camped up the other trail out of Pampa Linda. Lake Lion.

But the weather was too uncertain.

I got back to the trailhead at Pampa Linda with about 90 minutes to spare. After dropping my registration confirming my return, I washed up in the river. Then ate the rest of my camping food.

These colourful birds came by seemingly looking for a handout. There are many big, beautiful birds in Argentina.

The shuttle buses left promptly at 5pm. It seemed nobody who had booked was missing.

I couldn’t keep my eyes open for much of the 2 hour ride back to Bariloche.

Click PLAY or watch the video on YouTube.

day 1 | 2 | video | info page

___

A much better trip report than my own was posted last year by another old Canadian, Ramblin’ Boy:

The Hike To Refugio Otto Meiling – Getting Close To Cerro Tronador

 

 

 

hiking Tronador to Otto Meiling – day 1

trip report by site editor Rick McCharles 

day 1 | 2 | video | info page

The main hub for hikers in the Argentinian lake district is Bariloche.

The population of 130,000 plus tourists stretches along the busy lakeside highway. It should be another Banff, Chamonix, Queenstown … but isn’t. Many (including myself) become disenchanted with the place after a while.

Super popular with hikers, however, out of Bariloche is a one night adventure to climb an extinct volcano called Tronador (Thunderer) 3,470 m, the highest peak in the area. A 1200m ascent from the valley trailhead.

Argentina can be frustrating for tourists. Mucho problemas. But one highlight is Club Andino Bariloche (CAB). It’s an excellent organization which runs a number of alpine huts (refugios) and campgrounds.

Though the Government Parks office in Bariloche is often closed, CAB seems to always be open, staffed with friendly, English speaking experts.

At CAB, buy a return hiker’s shuttle bus ticket to Pampa Linda for about $40. Pampa Linda is the trailhead for Tronador.

We departed Bariloche 8:30am. It’s a bumpy, dusty, but scenic 77km to Pampa Linda close to the Chilean border.

Here you fill out a mandatory, free registration form.

I hung around Pampa Linda letting the largest group of hikers get started ahead of me.

The trail is a road to start. But green and tranquil.

Hoping to shortcut I jumped on to a smaller trail … It turned out to be the side trip to Mirador del Valle, a valley view point. Oops.

It took me 20 minutes or so to realize my mistake. But rather than admit I was an idiot, I dropped my pack and carried on up the little used, overgrown trail.

I never did make it to the viewpoint. But here’s a photo looking back to the valley.

The main trail does get steeper in places. There are stairs and switchbacks.

After spending 4 days above tree line on my last hike, it was a nice change to walk in bamboo forest shaded by huge trees.

Still, I was looking forward to views from up high. It was exciting to finally reach the big vistas.

Perhaps most impressive were waterfalls coming off the glacier.
Weather was deteriorating rapidly so I didn’t stop.

I’ve seen condors many times, but it was still thrilling to see two flying by very close. They circled the alpine hut, too.

I rushed up to choose my (semi-protected) campsite for the night. I wanted to get as close to the glacier as possible.
It began to rain just as I set up the tent. So I didn’t do much sightseeing at dusk.

Instead I read my book. Then headed over to the famed Otto Meiling hut.

Otto Meiling (Cerro Tronador)

As a solo English speaking hiker I don’t much enjoy stepping into these cramped, expensive refuges, but Otto Meiling is better than most in Argentina. It’s quite cosy indoors.

Otto Meiling (1902-1989), a German immigrant and carpenter/mountaineer, built the hut in the 1950s. He climbed the mountain 15 times. At age 84, he made an ascent from Pampa Linda and returned in one day! His fondness for mountaineering led to founding the Club Andino de Bariloche which is thriving today.

Otto Meiling

I’d neglected to carry wine so hoped to purchase one glass to celebrate inside away from the drizzle. Unfortunately this hut only sells wine by the bottle. I had a $5 hot chocolate instead. Food and drink are good, but understandably expensive, in alpine huts.

Not lasting long I retreated to my cozy tent to watch an episode of Fortitude. Then listen to my (excellent) biography of Leonardo da Vinci.

Friends had been up a few nights early in perfect weather. No moon. Here’s how it looked.

– by Peter Battelli

day 1 | 2 | video | info page

 

 

movie – first kayak descent in Greenland

Into Twin Galaxies

These three are crazy.

Erik Boomer, Ben Stookesberry and Sarah McNair-Landry.

National Geographic:

The intrepid trio, composed of previous Adventurers of the Year, kite-skied across the Greenland ice sheet and paddled the first descent of a wild Arctic river to win our first ever Hall of Fame award. …

Click PLAY or watch the trailer on Vimeo.

I saw the film on the Banff Mountain Film Festival World Tour in 2018.

related – Making of Into Twin Galaxies

Amatola Trail, South Africa

“The Toughest (hutted) Hike in South Africa”

Stingy Nomads:

Amatola trail is an amazing hike near Hogsback, a small town in Eastern Cape province, South Africa.

The trail length is 100 km …

… 6 days and 5 nights

… rain forest, mountains and fields, pass many waterfalls, pools and look outs on the way. …

It’s hut-to-hut hiking so you can keep your pack weight down.

Gwili Gwili hut

Amatola trail hiking guide. 6-day hike near Hogsback

related – Hiking South Africa – Amatola Hiking Trail

NOT the best of The Bruce – Hamilton waterfalls

trip report by best hike editor Rick McCharles

I parked at Felker Falls trailhead based on a recommendation posted on the official Bruce Trail website.

Felker’s to Albion Falls promised 4 waterfalls over 10.3 km return.

Though Felker’s Falls was little more than a dribble, the hike started well.

Some lovely autumn colours.

But soon I found myself in residential housing.

Then crossing under a freeway.

Hamilton — a city of over a half million — has a lovely trail system. I’d cycle it extensively if I lived here.

It’s home to more than 100 waterfalls and cascades, most of which are on or near the Bruce Trail. 

Albion Falls was the best I saw.

The most spectacular is Webster’s Falls. But it wasn’t on my itinerary.

I’d not recommend you make a special trip to Hamilton to hike the waterfalls. Many other sections of the Bruce are more appealing.

The Bruce Trail is more than 890 km (550 mi) long and there are over 400 km (250 mi) of associated side trails. I spent a week hiking some of the best sections.

related:

• Bruce Trail app | Bruce Trail Reference Guide – 29th Ed

• BruceTrail.org