documentary – Surviving the Outback

Michael Atkinson places himself in the historic predicament of two stranded German aviators in 1932 to see if the his skills as a survival instructor, pilot and adventurer will allow him to escape to the nearest civilization.

It is a gripping film.

I learned a lot about surviving in the harsh Australian coastal wilderness.

The most remarkable feature of this documentary is its mode of filming. It is not performed by any film crew that follows his journey. It is single-handedly managed by Mike through drones and cameras so it preserves the natural element. The breathtaking pictures of the ocean, varied shades of the waters, flora and fauna of marine sea and the natural cliffs along the coast paint an excellent landscape for the viewers. It manages to take one to an unexplored world …

 Watch the hour long documentary FREE on TubiTV.

Tasmania’s Three Capes Track

Has the Overland Track, Australia’s most famous long-distance walk, just been usurped? Edging along the tops of cliffs that soar more than 300m above the unruly Southern Ocean, the Three Capes Track (threecapestrack.com.au) has quickly assumed the mantle of Australia’s most intriguing bushwalk.

The four-day, 46km track opened to huge expectations at the end of 2015 …
… criticisms that have hounded the track are the cost (at AU$495 per person, it’s more than double the price of the Overland Track) and initially there were no camping facilities for traditional bushwalkers. …

To regulate walker numbers, which have been capped at 48 setting out each day, Tasmania’s Parks and Wildlife Service has established a permit system. Bookings should be made at threecapestrack.com.au/booking.

The walk officially begins at the Port Arthur Historic Site, about a 90-minute drive from the Tasmanian capital of Hobart.

Lonely Planet

People love it.
Cape Pillar Peninsula from the Blade
(Photo courtesy of Stuart Gibson)
3CT Map

HIKE the Dragon’s Back, Hong Kong

trip report by site editor Rick McCharles (2011)

The Dragon’s Back is more than a hike, it’s a “tourist attraction”.

The Dragon’s Back (Traditional Chinese: 龍脊) is a ridge in southeastern Hong Kong Island, Hong Kong, between Wan Cham Shan and Shek O Peak. It lies within the Shek O Country Park. In 2004 the Dragon’s Back Trail was selected by TIMEasia as the best urban hiking trail.

See reviews on Trip Adviser.

trail signboard

Despite all that popularity, I loved it.

Who wouldn’t love a ridge walk on a tropical island?

Many start up the Hong Kong tram and hike down to Big Wave Bay, but I followed the longer and more difficult 8.5km route recommended in The Inside Guide to Hikes and Walks in Hong Kong, a free publication from Hong Kong Tourism.

If you get to Hong Kong, the Dragon’s Back is a must hike.

Friends, loved ones and unloved who don’t want to go can wait at the finish, Big Wave Bay Beach.

see more photos from my day hike

related – Hiking the World trip report  (2016)

15 iconic Oregon coast hikes

From towering Neahkahnie Mountain to the chasms of Cape Perpetua, there are hiking trails that run up and down our gorgeous coastline, exploring the forests, dunes, tide pools and beaches that make it up.

… One of the best things about hiking the Oregon coast is how easily you can access such incredible views …

OregonHikers.org

Blacklock Point from Floras Lake Hike

Alberni Inlet Trail, Vancouver Island

trip report by BestHike editor Rick McCharles

Stage 1 – Port Alberni to China Creek

  • 15 kms one way (I stopped at 13 kms)
  • 6 hours (I took 4 hrs)
  • elevation gain 3937 ft
  • Ship Creek Road trailhead to China Creek trailhead
  • panorama of the city of Port Alberni
  • route options: Follinsbee Creek (easier) or Lookout and the old Copper Mountain Trail (harder)
  • moderate difficulty
  • plenty of ups and downs
  • some fallen logs to scramble

My Dad dropped me at the Port Alberni visitor centre. This was the start of my Pacific N.W. BikePacking tour.

For my first hike, I used the paid version of the AllTrails app. And I needed AllTrails as parts of the trail close to China Creek are overgrown and difficult to find.

Even better is the Relive app. Click PLAY or relive my hike on YouTube.

It was tougher than I expected with non-stop up and downs.

There are many bears in the area. This was the only sign I saw.

In fact, the only animal life of interest was the first Garter Snake I’ve seen this season.

Wild flowers lovely.

This trail is maintained. But the section closer to Port Alberni is in far better shape.

At times you have to rely on flagging tape to find the trail.

One highlight is a vista of Port Alberni from on high.

The coastal section is cool. Boom.

All in all, I’d recommend the Alberni Inlet trail.