The Fight for America’s Public Lands

Trump and the Republican Party have been ruthless for 4-years selling out public land to rich supporters and corporations. The Environmental Protection Agency has weakened regulations.

For example, a Judge removed Trump public lands chief —a former oil industry attorney — who’d been working in that position illegally. 

Patagonia has just released The Fight for America’s Public Lands.

A feature-length documentary about America’s system of public lands and the fight to protect them.

Despite support from voters across the political spectrum, our public lands face unprecedented threats from extractive industries and the politicians in their pockets.

Part love letter, part political exposé, Public Trust investigates how we arrived at this precarious moment through three heated conflicts—a national monument in the Utah desert, a mine in the Boundary Waters and oil drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge—and makes a case for their continued protection.

Take action to protect our public lands.

Text DEFEND to 71333.

Learn more about ‘Public Trust’ here.

Click PLAY or watch the trailer on YouTube.

OR Click PLAY or watch the entire documentary on YouTube.

John Muir was a racist

Michael Brune for the Sierra Club:

Muir was not immune to the racism peddled by many in the early conservation movement. He made derogatory comments about Black people and Indigenous peoples that drew on deeply harmful racist stereotypes, though his views evolved later in his life. …

Other early Sierra Club members and leaders — like Joseph LeConte and David Starr Jordan — were vocal advocates for white supremacy and its pseudo-scientific arm, eugenics. …

For all the harms the Sierra Club has caused, and continues to cause, to Black people, Indigenous people, and other people of color, I am deeply sorry. I know that apologies are empty unless accompanied by a commitment to change. I am making that commitment, publicly, right now. …

… we are redesigning our leadership structure so that Black, Indigenous, and other leaders of color at the Sierra Club make up the majority of the team making top-level organizational decisions. We will initiate similar changes to elevate the voices and experiences of staff of color across the organization. …

Pulling Down Our Monuments

I commend the Sierra Club for taking action to make outdoor adventure more welcoming to everyone.

Of course it’s not entirely fair to measure the racism of John Muir by today’s standards. For his time, Muir was comparatively enlightened. And did far more good than bad for all hikers.

His story reminds me of the racism of Mark Twain.

I still support the good works of Muir and Twain.  But let’s not put up any more statues to either.

(via Adventure Blog)

 

 

 

Cycle hiking Gabriola Island, B.C.

Trip report by BestHike editor Rick McCharles.

On July 1, 2020 I cycle toured Gabriola Island, the first time I’d been back to the island since I was a kid on family summer vacation.

Gabriola is about 14 kilometres (9 mi) long by 4.2 kilometres (2.6 mi) wide, about the same land mass as Bermuda.

I caught the ferry over from Nanaimo in the early evening.

Next morning, while celebrating Canada Day, I was reminded that descendants of the original inhabitants are still there — the Snuneymuxw, a First Nation of the Coast Salish People.

Sobering.

First stop was the Malaspina Galleries, a sandstone cliff carved by wind and waves. Lovely shoreline, as well.

To navigate I used Cycling the Islands: A Guide to Scenic Routes on the San Juan and Gulf Islands by John Crouch.

And Hiking Trails 2: South-Central Vancouver Island and the Gulf Islands by Richard K. Blier.

Gabriola is less developed than I anticipated.  A definite hippy vibe.

I circled the island counter-clockwise, stopping next at Sandwell Provincial Park.

Popped in briefly to Joyce Lockwood Community Park.

There’s a marina and campground at Silva Bay at the far end of the island.

Cycling and hiking temperate rain forest is wonderful when it’s not raining. And the rain held off this day.

My last stop was Drumbeg Provincial Park.

One day was enough to explore Gabriola. All good. The hiking trail infrastructure is excellent for a small island. Paths well marked.

All trails are short and easy.

I recommend Gabriola.

Out There: A Voice from the Wild by Chris Townsend

Chris Townsend (born 1949) is the hiking author who’s influenced me most.

He’s written over 20 books, including Cicerone guidebooks,  and countless articles

I started with High Summer: Backpacking The Canadian Rockies (1989).

He’s most famous for The Backpacker’s Handbook.

But If you’ve never read Chris Townsend, I’d recommend you start with Out There: A Voice from the Wild. I recently read the Kindle edition while hiking on Vancouver Island.

Chris reflects back on the takeaways from all those trips.

Drawing from more than forty years of experience as an outdoorsman, and probably the world’s best known long distance walker who also writes, Chris Townsend describes the landscapes and wildlife, the walkers and climbers, and the authors who have influenced him in this lucid and beautiful book.

Writing from his home in the heart of the Cairngorms he discusses the wild, its importance to civilisation and how we cannot do without it.

#BlackLivesMatter

This campaign is against violence and systemic racism towards black people.

And broader issues such as racial profilingpolice brutality, and racial inequality.

Those are part of the bigger issue – human rights regardless of age, ethnic origin, location, language, religion, ethnicity, or any other status.

Out in the wilds it’s easy to see we are all created equal.

View this post on Instagram

Hello, friends. Hello, white people. Hello, everyone. We have issues. Just because many of you (myself included) enjoy extended periods of time in the mountains – away from "the world" – doesn't mean that we are absolved of societal obligations. The United States has never been great. Slavery was around until 1865. Women couldn't vote until 1920. Race-based discrimination was legal until 1964. Same-sex marriage could be outlawed until 2015. Unarmed black people are killed in the streets and in their homes with virtual immunity to this day. The US is plagued by systemic racism. Police who commit murder and beat protesters need to be held accountable. Police are (supposedly) trained professionals whose job it is to protect and serve their communities. There's no excuse. Have you ever seen a report of some corrupt and dysfunctional-looking country and thought to yourself, "I sure am glad I don't have to live there."? Guess what – that's us. The world is looking at the US and thanking whatever god they pray to that they weren't born here – that they don't have to worry about being killed or beaten in the streets by their police. This is far from the greatest country on Earth. The delusion you're immune to these issues (yes, even those of us who choose to occupy outdoor spaces – seemingly untouched by society) only allows this cancer to grow into a larger problem. Just as COVID-19 managed to infiltrate every societal crevasse, so too will failure to address the need for policy and police reform. This is on you. You can help make this country better. Don’t know where to start? Start by saying you care and that you aren’t okay with the state of this country. We don't just vote for the President and Congress. We vote for judges, mayors, governors, district attorneys, and sheriffs. Local authorities hold a lot of power (e.g. the current pandemic) – it's not just about Washington DC. So support Black Lives Matter, support the National Police Accountability Project, educate those who are choosing to focus on looting and rioting instead of why these things are happening in the first place. Much love, friends. -Mac #blacklivesmatter

A post shared by Mac | Halfway Anywhere (@halfwayanywhere) on

documentary – Nomad women migrating in Mongolia

Marinel Malvar de Jesus is a Filipina American lawyer who decided to leave that world to set up her own trekking company Peak Explorations.

She relocated to Peru. And is currently in Mongolia for the COVID-19 lockdown.

She was there working on a documentary about a group of nomad Kazakh women making a camel trek through the Altai Mountains.

“We Are Nomads is a film about celebrating the relevance and history of women in the adventure and outdoor spaces. …

It will play during a film festival May 30-June 1, 2020.

Click PLAY or watch a trailer on YouTube.

Details.

Tips for hiking during COVID-19

Obey all laws.

Do nothing unethical.

Ensure you stay physically distant from strangers.

But get out of doors as much as you can. 

Click PLAY or see tips on Instagram.

Hiking in Place: Inspiration Near Home

Hike in Place: What It Means

Hike in place does not mean to literally walk in place. No, instead, the Superior Hiking Trail Association encourages people to rediscover hikes and nature in your neighborhood. …

GearJunkie 

As I’m physically isolating in a small town on Vancouver Island, each day I’m cycling, running or walking the closest parks.

Top Bridge Regional Trail