Length of South America in 730 days self-powered

On October 27th, 2018 the two woman Her Odyssey team completed crossing South America.

In 730 days they walked and paddled 12,913 km (8,024 mi) across six countries; Argentina, Chile, Bolivia, Peru, Ecuador, and Colombia.

Fidgit (Bethany Hughes) and Neon (Lauren Reed) are continuing the 5 year project, still heading north.

Click PLAY or get a glimpse of their first continent on YouTube.

Walking the Himalayas by Lev Wood

I was disappointed in this book.

Others disagree. It’s got fairly good ratings on GoodReads.

I learned very little about the Himalayas. Indeed most of the book has him nowhere near the mountains. He’s road walking in the lowlands.

I assume Lev’s boring route had to do with logistics for the film crew following along.

Ryan Sandes and Ryno Griesel ran much higher trails by comparison.

The book is poorly written too.

He got travel advice from the Dalai Lama. That bit I enjoyed.

And the tale of their vehicle crash was horrific. One of the real dangers of the Himalaya is motor vehicle accident.

related – TV series – Walking the Himalayas

Cape Wrath Trail, Scotland

Cam Honan

The Cape Wrath Trail is often referred to as Britain’s toughest long distance walk. Stretching approximately 230 miles (370 km) from the Highland hub of Fort William to the remote lighthouse of Cape Wrath, it is an unmarked and sometimes trailless route that passes through the wild and spectacular landscapes of northwestern Scotland. Due to the unpredictable weather and challenging terrain, it is a hike that is best suited to experienced ramblers who possess a good level of fitness, navigation skill, and a stoic disregard of having wet feet.

I hiked the Cape Wrath Trail in the summer of 2018. …

Cape Wrath Trail Backpacking Guide

Isobel Glover 1st to hike Vancouver Island end-to-end

Glover wanted to use her The Island in My Backyard expedition to show people how readily accessible — and relatively cheap — such a journey can be for those who live here. No flights or ferries to go on this trip. She didn’t even have to get in a car.

“I just went out my front door and started walking.” …

… The Vancouver Island Trail — also known as the Spine Trail — is only 80 per cent complete, and even then “trail” can mean anything from a dead flat, three-metre-wide, groomed path to a never-trodden forest route only discernible by occasional markings on the trees.

Then there were the gaps where forging ahead meant bushwhacking down 45-degree slopes.

Glover planned meticulously, preparing dried food and figuring out routes that would allow her to camp close to water sources, but even then there’s nothing quite like the reality of forest so dense that it’s all but impossible to cover the 20 metres from tent to lake. …

Intrepid soul shows how to step up to nature

She had some funding from the Alpine Club of Canada for this adventure.

The Vancouver Island Trail is a multi-use (foot, cycle, equestrian) non-motorized trail, that links communities and ecosystems along a 765 km long, north-south transect of Vancouver Island. It uses both new and existing trails and inactive and active logging roads. At the start of 2018, it is still a work in progress with approximately 86% of it now complete.

For more details on the history of the trail, the organization’s Mission and Vision statements, recent newsletters and trail progress, and to become involved, please visit our website: vispine.ca

There’s an online hiking guidebook in the works.