Refuge Entre Deux Eaux in the French Alps

Guest post.

How a Law Student in Paris and a Designer in Tokyo became Guardians of a Mountain Refuge in the Alps

When packing for your stay at Refuge Entre Deux Eaux, we recommend leaving your neon lycra pants and tinned food at home. Upon arrival, you’ll meet your hosts Clara and Björn who will probably greet you in ripped jeans and sneakers, and then offer you a slice of local, organic blueberry pie hot from the oven.

Perched 2200m above sea level in Vanoise National Park, there stands a one hundred year old mountain refuge situated “entre deux eaux” (between two mountain streams) which richly rewards those who venture out to find it.

From June to September every year, Clara and Björn ascend into the French Alps to assume their seasonal role as caretakers of the refuge, creating a haven for hikers and travellers who stop by for anything from a glass of local wine to a night’s stay complete with dinner and breakfast service. For those few summer months, the old house is filled with the aromas of country cooking, the sounds of different languages and occasional accordion jam sessions which have been known to break out spontaneously in the communal kitchen.

Today at the Refuge Entre Deux Eaux, travellers can enjoy organic blueberry pie from the tiny nearby village of La Chappelle-du-Bard, buttery tomme cheese from a local fromagerie and natural locally made wines by families who have practised their art for generations.

Guests who wish to stay for a meal are treated to dishes characterised by simplicity and showcase products from the region like pork sautéed with baby carrots and turnips, veal blanquette and hachis parmentier, France’s answer to shepherd’s pie.

The kitchen also happily caters for vegetarians on a daily basis, to support individuals who wish to minimise the impact their food choices have on the planet. “Our dishes are designed around local products and from environmentally friendly agriculture,” says Clara. “We’re committed to investing in the local market and supporting producers by paying them at the right price. When food is sourced, produced and prepared sustainably and locally, it tastes better. And isn’t eating well the most important thing on a mountain expedition?”


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The Rift – 9 months walking Africa’s Rift Valley

A new documentary.

Louis Devereux producer:

In September 2015 Robert Devereux, my father, set out to do it himself, attempting to become the first person in the world to do it in one go! …

Robert finished walking in April 2016. After nearly three years of working on this documentary I am now asking for your help. …

We are very close to a finished film, we have a 75 minute cut and are tweaking in the edit suite even as the campaign is live. …

kickstarter

Click PLAY or watch a clip on Vimeo.

Masahito Yoshida ends 10 years walking

Yoshida’s journey has taken him all around the world — from Asia to North America to Africa — on a trip he says spanned about 77,500 kilometres. …

Yoshida plans to head back to Japan next — this time by plane — where he said he’ll take on a job working at a hotel at Mount Fuji, and get some rest.

Now, he’s finished it all off in the North, walking the new highway from Inuvik to reach the Arctic coast, in Tuktoyaktuk.

A walk in his shoes: Japanese man caps off years-long walk around world in Tuktoyaktuk

“I’m so tired now,” says Masahito Yoshida, who started walking from China nearly 10 years ago

Hiking St. George’s, Bermuda

trip report by BestHike editor Rick McCharles

St. George’s was the first part of Bermuda to be extensively colonized, and the town of St. George’s contains many of the territory’s oldest buildings.

It’s claimed to be the oldest continuously-inhabited English town in the New World.

While visiting I walked all parts of the island many times. Here are some highlights.

Click PLAY or watch it on YouTube.

That footage is shot using the Osmo Mobile 2 gimbal with an iPhone X.

Though the gimbal weighs 485g (17oz) I’ll be carrying it on many future hikes.

2006 murder in the Himalayas

Winner of the 2011 Banff Mountain Festival Book Award: Best Book, Mountain and Wilderness Literature.

… in 2006, an impulsive, naïve young Tibetan nun and her best friend, both yearning for religious freedom from Chinese rule, joined a group of fellow Tibetans desperate to escape to India, where the Dalai Lama has lived since the 1950 annexation of Tibet by China.

Kelsang Namtso and Dolma Palkyi embarked on the brutal journey over the Himalayas. Smuggled by illegal guides past Chinese border police, the group braved freezing temperatures and snow, the high altitude, and perilous crevasses.

Green alternates the refugees’ trek with that of Luis Benitez, an American celebrity mountain guide leading a rich group of international clients to the Himalayan peak Cho Oyu. The two groups met on the peak as Chinese guards, alerted to the refugees’ presence, chased after the escapees with machine guns ablaze, and Kelsang was killed in full view of the Westerners. …

Murder in the High Himalaya: Loyalty, Tragedy, and Escape from Tibet by Jonathan Green (2010)

Click PLAY or watch it on YouTube.

The author is a good writer. But there are numerous factual errors. He needed a better editor and more expert proof readers.

Green doesn’t sound like a climbing insider to me. I suspected he’d never visited Cho Oyu nor Tibet in writing the book.

hiking the Lofoten Islands, Norway

travel2walk posted a very detailed trip report on how to hike Lofoten north of the Arctic Circle.

The Lofoten Islands are characterised by their mountains and peaks, sheltered inlets, stretches of seashore and large virgin areas. …

May and June are the driest months, while October has three times as much precipitation. …

The easiest way to get there is to fly Oslo to Bodø.

Read the trip report.

If interested in organizing something for yourself, check this Lofoten hiking guidebook and website.