Nuk Tessli lodge north of Vancouver

Oded Goffer sends a link.

Nuk Tessli is a remote lodge ideally situated for hikers.

You can fly in from Nimpo Lake, “Floatplane capital of BC”, near Tweedsmuir National Park.

30 years ago the first cabins were built by an amazing lady who lived here alone through winters and summers for 23 of those years.

Doron and Sela, the current owners of the cabins, have spent much time and efforts in the past 7 years in order to build and improve the cabins. In addition they made sure to explore this untouched natural resort, marking new trails without hurting the gentle environmental.

Click over to NukTessli.com for more information.

And costs. Room and board there costs $175 CAD / person / day in 2018. Price of the flight around $100 CAD – $150 CAD depending on number of people.

The Coast Mountains are the great, relatively unexplored part of Canada. So close to Vancouver yet so little visited. I can’t think of a better way to get there.

Ptarmigan Cirque, Alberta

I was born in Calgary, Alberta close to Banff. If you asked me to recommend the best day hike out of the city it would be Ptarmigan Cirque.

Hike Bike Travel:

It’s a 3.6 kilometre loop (if you include the interpretive trail) with 210 metres of elevation gain. There is the option to hike a section of the scramblers trail that heads for Mt. Rae.

For a short hike it delivers a tremendous variety of scenery – including coniferous forests, high alpine meadows, mountains and waterfalls. It’s the perfect hike to take your out of town guests who want a taste of the mountains without spending a full day in them – and it’s a great one for families too. …

Ptarmigan Cirque Hike In Kananaskis Country

The trailhead is off Highwood Pass (2,206m), getting you to elevation easily.

The Great Divide Trail is TOUGH

  • snow
  • river crossings
  • wet feet
  • weather
  • permits
  • campsite reservations
  • resupply

The Great Divide Trail traverses the continental divide between Alberta and British Columbia, wandering through the vast wilderness of the Canadian Rocky Mountains for more than 1100 kilometres. …

The Great Divide Trail is not officially signed and not always even an actual trail, sometimes merely a wilderness route, inspiring modern-day adventurers to walk the same paths of the original explorers to the area. A journey on the Great Divide Trail promises to be demanding but on the GDT you’ll discover a definitive wilderness experience in one of the most magnificent settings on Earth.

Great Divide Trail Association

Click PLAY or watch some of the challenges on YouTube. (2014)

Still interested?

Why Not and Lady on a Rock are doing it. Grizzlies? What Grizzlies?

Start here – Off to Canada’s Great Divide Trail (July 1, 2018). Click through for day-by-day trip reports.

related – Advice To Future GDTers

NEW – Transcaucasian Trail

Over the next five years, the Transcaucasian Trail (TCT) project aims to develop a world-class, long-distance trail network across the Caucasus, linking roughly two dozen existing and proposed national parks in the region. The network will consist of two intersecting trail corridors, each roughly 1500 km long. One corridor, oriented east to west, will connect the Black Sea and the Caspian Sea, and the other, oriented north to south, will connect the Greater Caucasus and the Lesser Caucasus.

About

transcaucasian-trail

Click PLAY or watch it on Vimeo.

hiking Yellowstone to the Yukon

This looks good.

Karsten Heuer’s journey was intended to show that such a system of parks and corridors is feasible. He set out in June 1998 from Yellowstone Park, Wyoming, on the beginning of a 3,400 kilometre hike that would end, 18 months later, in Watson Lake, Yukon Territory.

Along the way, he faced personal problems, including the breakup of his relationship with the woman who had planned the journey with him. He came to terms with difficult public relations problems when he spoke to loggers and others with a stake in the economic exploitation of wild lands. And, above all, he overcame extraordinary physical challenges: ferocious storms, avalanches, apparently impassable rivers in full flood, and bears that mistook him for dinner.

Accompanied by occasional human companions and a remarkable border collie named Webster …

walking-the-big-wild-y2y

Y2Y.net

walking-the-big-wild

Laugavegur trek, Iceland

I’m starting Iceland’s most famous walk July 24, 2018. Wish me luck.

My first attempt a few years ago failed. Wanting to hike in June, the trails were far too muddy.

One of the best hikes in the world is the Laugavegur

 (Landmannalaugar to Skógar route)

by clesenne

by clesenne

AT A GLANCE

  • IcelandIceland‘s best hike
  • weird and wonderful landscapes
  • best route is Skógar – Landmannalaugar 77km (48mi) in 4-6 days in either direction
  • shorter options 55km (34mi) or 22km (13.6mi)
  • tent or sleep in huts
  • permits not required
  • steep rough, rocky and slippery slopes
  • in good weather, this trek is only moderately difficult
  • up to 100 hikers starting each day during high season July and August
  • it can be dangerous in bad weather. About every second year someone dies.

Click PLAY or watch Alastair Humphrey’s highlights on Vimeo.

Check our Laugavegur information page on how to organize this adventure for yourself.

The Great Outdoors Is Getting Crowded [infographic]

Guest post by Dustin Walker

“National Parks Are Being Loved To Death.”

This headline has been repeated by media so often in 2018 that it’s become almost a cliché.  

And it’s all because of recent statistics showing a more than 21% spike in visitors to U.S. national parks over the past decade. Canada is no different. Park attendance there jumped 27% in the past decade.

All this extra foot traffic means more pressure on park infrastructure, increased human-wildlife conflicts and added stress on the environment (check out the infographic below for more details on this).

What’s causing the surge? No one seems to be certain. However, theories range from social media influence and demographic trends to successful state ad campaigns. But one solution to the problem — at least, from my perspective — is far more obvious:

We need to seek out the trails less traveled.

Much of the overcrowding in parks is happening at the most well-known outdoor “hotspots.” Places like the Grand Canyon and Yosemite in the U.S. Or Banff and Jasper in Canada.

And yet, there are plenty of lesser-known backpacking and hiking trails throughout North America that offer an amazing experience — without the crowds.

Now, don’t get me wrong: I’m not suggesting you avoid the best hikes altogether — I’d hate to dissuade anyone from trekking the West Coast Trail or the John Muir Trail.

But I do think that tourism organizations, governments and — to some extent — the media should put more effort into promoting North America’s hidden gems. Whether it’s a little-known hiking trail, a rarely explored park or a lake that’s simply left off the typical tourist map.

Not only would this help alleviate some of the pressure on crowded national parks. It would also introduce more people to the thrill of exploring off-the-beaten path.

This infographic was made by Slick & Twisted Trails

DUSTIN WALKER’S BIO:

Dustin runs Slick & Twisted Trails – a blog for hikers & backpackers who shun the beaten path. Based on Canada’s Vancouver Island, Dustin is always on the hunt for those rare, less-traveled routes through the wilderness.