Walking the Himalayas by Lev Wood

I was disappointed in this book.

Others disagree. It’s got fairly good ratings on GoodReads.

I learned very little about the Himalayas. Indeed most of the book has him nowhere near the mountains. He’s road walking in the lowlands.

I assume Lev’s boring route had to do with logistics for the film crew following along.

Ryan Sandes and Ryno Griesel ran much higher trails by comparison.

The book is poorly written too.

He got travel advice from the Dalai Lama. That bit I enjoyed.

And the tale of their vehicle crash was horrific. One of the real dangers of the Himalaya is motor vehicle accident.

related – TV series – Walking the Himalayas

Pacific Crest Trail stats

Mac posted his 6th annual Pacific Crest Trail (2018) Thru-hiker Survey, a terrific resource. It’s interesting to see what gear successful hikers carried and liked best.

He interviewed 496 PCT hikers:

  • Average age 34. 65% began hiking alone
  • 81% said they’d consider hiking the PCT again
  • On average, thru hikers spent $6,274

Click through to read more:

2018 Pacific Crest Trail Thru-hiker Survey

Cape Wrath Trail, Scotland

Cam Honan

The Cape Wrath Trail is often referred to as Britain’s toughest long distance walk. Stretching approximately 230 miles (370 km) from the Highland hub of Fort William to the remote lighthouse of Cape Wrath, it is an unmarked and sometimes trailless route that passes through the wild and spectacular landscapes of northwestern Scotland. Due to the unpredictable weather and challenging terrain, it is a hike that is best suited to experienced ramblers who possess a good level of fitness, navigation skill, and a stoic disregard of having wet feet.

I hiked the Cape Wrath Trail in the summer of 2018. …

Cape Wrath Trail Backpacking Guide

Isobel Glover 1st to hike Vancouver Island end-to-end

Glover wanted to use her The Island in My Backyard expedition to show people how readily accessible — and relatively cheap — such a journey can be for those who live here. No flights or ferries to go on this trip. She didn’t even have to get in a car.

“I just went out my front door and started walking.” …

… The Vancouver Island Trail — also known as the Spine Trail — is only 80 per cent complete, and even then “trail” can mean anything from a dead flat, three-metre-wide, groomed path to a never-trodden forest route only discernible by occasional markings on the trees.

Then there were the gaps where forging ahead meant bushwhacking down 45-degree slopes.

Glover planned meticulously, preparing dried food and figuring out routes that would allow her to camp close to water sources, but even then there’s nothing quite like the reality of forest so dense that it’s all but impossible to cover the 20 metres from tent to lake. …

Intrepid soul shows how to step up to nature

She had some funding from the Alpine Club of Canada for this adventure.

The Vancouver Island Trail is a multi-use (foot, cycle, equestrian) non-motorized trail, that links communities and ecosystems along a 765 km long, north-south transect of Vancouver Island. It uses both new and existing trails and inactive and active logging roads. At the start of 2018, it is still a work in progress with approximately 86% of it now complete.

For more details on the history of the trail, the organization’s Mission and Vision statements, recent newsletters and trail progress, and to become involved, please visit our website: vispine.ca

There’s an online hiking guidebook in the works.

Heather Anderson’s Calendar-Year Triple Crown

Only five others—all men—have completed the thru-hiker’s Holy Grail in fewer than 365 days

The Triple Crown is often considered the pinnacle of the thru-hiking world. To complete the feat, a person must hike the 2,190-mile Appalachian, 2,650-mile Pacific Crest, and 3,100-mile Continental Divide trails …

But for a select few, there is an even more impressive Triple Crown to be had: Hiking all three trails in a single year, a challenge that’s dubbed the Calendar-Year Triple Crown …

Before this trip, she’d already Triple Crowned twice, setting the overall self-supported Fastest Known Time (FKT) for the Pacific Crest Trail and the self-supported FKT for the Appalachian Trail. (A new FKT for the Appalachian Trail was set by Karel Sabbe in August, but Anderson still holds the women’s record.) After this season, Anderson is now the fastest woman to ever Triple Crown and the first woman to triple Triple Crown.  …

Outside

first person to walk Canada’s Great Trail

Great Trail was formerly called the Trans-Canada Trail. (TheGreat Trail.ca)

Completing this hike makes Dana Meise
@TheHikingFool the first person to touch all three coasts on the Trans Canada Trail.

… Thursday evening he made it to Tuktoyaktuk, completing his lifelong dream; and it’s in part thanks to the community. …

“As much as I’m super excited to finish … I’m also excited to get home,” he said.

Meise, originally from Sherwood Park, Alta, started his adventure in Cape Spear, Nfld. in 2008.

The trip has not been all in one go.

Alberta man finishes record 10-year hike in Tuktoyaktuk

Beacons Way hike, Wales

The Beacons Way is a waymarked long distance footpath in the Brecon Beacons National ParkWales. …

152 km / 95 miles east to west through the National Park, and passes many of the most important landmarks and mountain peaks in the mountain range. It also includes many of the towns in the park as well as popular attractions such as Carreg Cennen Castle near Llandeilo at the western end of the path. …

6-8 days are often recommended. Open moorland. Weather is often a challenge.

Sept 2015 Brecon Beacons Routemaster in Depth with Mark Rowe – images by Steve Morgan

Check the guidebook.